Assistance with maintenance of Rose Hill Cemetery did not come to a vote and was not on the agenda for the April 17 Hope City Board of Directors meeting, but the discussion, led by concerned citizen Hazel Simpson, covered the issue of sunken graves and excessive flooding of many of the grave plots.

Assistance with maintenance of Rose Hill Cemetery did not come to a vote and was not on the agenda for the April 17 Hope City Board of Directors meeting, but the discussion, led by concerned citizen Hazel Simpson, covered the issue of sunken graves and excessive flooding of many of the grave plots.
"We want to know if the City has any plans to fill in those graves," Simpson asked.
A historic cemetery, Rose Hill, also referred to as "Cave Hill" is currently maintained with donations.
"The City has no current plans to spend money on Rose Hill,” City Manager Catherine Cook said, “Day to day maintenance is supported by donations. The flooding of sunken graves can be corrected with the usual maintenance.”
Several attendees expressed dissatisfaction with the overall presentation of the town, particularly on main thoroughfares citing several business and residential sites that are unattractive.
"Frontage is always a concern" Hope Mayor Steve Montgomery responded. "We have the issue with Family Dollar, of course, and that whole lot with cars scattered about on 2nd. We address these when and how we can."
Cook reminded everyone that several projects like the Hope Pavilion were underway and that the face of the town is improving.
Cook and Finance Director Debbie Hall also delivered the First Quarter 2018 Revenue and Expense Reports. All line items were reported within budget including the General Fund, the Street Fund, Sanitation, and Waste Water.
The Board also unanimously voted to accept the bid of Hostetler Roofing of Nashville to replace the roof of one of the Public Works buildings at a cost of $14,750.00. The competing bid from $30,644 from John Collins Roofing and Construction of Van Buren was declined. Cook noted the low bid amount was already in line with the 2018 budget.
Additional reports included an update on the emergency warning cell phone system and that the repair and upkeep of all 67 disaster units would cost upwards of $40,000 a piece, which would not be fiscally viable.