Over the past three years, a virtual roll-call of Country music superstars and legends have paraded into Hope's Hempstead Hall, among them Trace Adkins, Ronnie Milsap, Sara Evans, Clint Black, the Oak Ridge Boys, and Joe Diffie.

Over the past three years, a virtual roll-call of Country music superstars and legends have paraded into Hope’s Hempstead Hall, among them Trace Adkins, Ronnie Milsap, Sara Evans, Clint Black, the Oak Ridge Boys, and Joe Diffie.
Georgia native and award-winning artist Travis Tritt joins that heralded list as he brings a full band with him to perform live at Hempstead Hall on Friday, April 6, at 7 p.m.
In an update Tuesday, Hempstead Hall Director Dolly Henley said, “He is one of those
music icons that several generations want to see in person. His concerts are great.  He interacts with the crowd. It looks like this will be one of Hempstead Hall's largest crowds for a Friday night concert.”
Given that 2017’s Trace Adkins concert saw an estimated record paid attendance of 1,512 jammed into Hempstead Hall, that is saying a lot, but Henley added, “Ticket sales have been really good for this Travis Tritt concert. People are excited.”
Tritt came up as a Country superstar in the 1990s “New Country-era” that included the rise of names like Garth Brooks, Clint Black and Alan Jackson. Black, of course, also appeared at Hempstead Hall last August.
Tritt’s now 25-year career has included accolades like two Grammy awards, three CMA Awards, and multiple No. 1 singles on the Country radio charts, not to mention millions in album and record sales.
Over the past year, Tritt released a live two-disc CD and DVD, entitled “A Man and His Guitar Live”, which captures one of his most acclaimed live shows, and highlighted his recent tour performances of more intimate intimate acoustic-style shows.
Henley, confirmed Tuesday afternoon, that for Hope’s Hempstead Hall performance, however, that Tritt will have a full band in tow.
“I think that for certain shows at certain times of the year that he does those more intimate one-man shows, but I can say that we’ve booked ten hotel rooms, so he is coming here with somebody,” Henley said.
Tritt’s “Southern-rock influenced” catalog includes a cache of Top 10 radio-friendly classics, like “Modern Day Bonnie and Clyde,” “Here’s A Quarter,” “T-R-O-U-B-L-E,” “Lord Have Mercy on the Working Man,” “Anymore,” and “It’s A Great Day To Be Alive.”
In various reviews of his recent acoustic-style shows, Tritt has even displayed more “Classic Rock” influences as well, performing versions of Bob Seger’s legendary “Night Moves,” and the Beatles’ standard “Help.”
Another Country legend, Waylon Jennings, has also been covered by several modern day stars, including Adkins and Black, and Tritt has been no different, performing Jennings’ classics like the famous 1980s Dukes of Hazard theme, “Good Ole Boys,” and the unmistakable “Mama, don’t let your babies grow up to be Cowboys.”
Throughout the 1990s and into the 2000’s, Tritt has been a presence at several national sporting events like the 1996 Olympics, a pair of Super Bowls, a World Series Game, the opening of the original Georgia Dome, the final Atlanta Braves game at Atlanta-Fulton Country Stadium, more recently in 2013, the NCAA men's basketball championship.