In an update to this story Friday afternoon, Parade coordinator Eddie Brazzel issued a statement, saying “The parade will line up at 6th and Elm and will follow the same route as our District Fair Parade. No need to register. Just come and be a part of this parade to honor our Vietnam Veterans.” Brazzel also said that no four-wheelers or ATVs were allowed.

In an update to this story Friday afternoon, Parade coordinator Eddie Brazzel issued a statement, saying “The parade will line up at 6th and Elm and will follow the same route as our District Fair Parade. No need to register. Just come and be a part of this parade to honor our Vietnam Veterans.”  Brazzel also said that no four-wheelers or ATVs were allowed.

Brazzel also said, "Everyone is welcome. All Vietnam Veterans, cars, floats, clubs, bands, first responders, law enforcement departments, fire departments, beauty contestants, tractors, horses, elected officials and those seeking office."

The original story as it appears in the print edition of the Friday Hope Star follows:

As the Vietnam War raged at its peak in 1968, 50 years later a series of celebrations and parades are being organized across the nation to honor those from that often-misunderstood conflict.  In downtown Hope, a Vietnam Veterans Parade is being organized for Thursday, March 29 starting at 6 p.m.
Organizer Ron Brown, a commander of the Billy T. Norton VFW Post, said, “This recognition is long overdue.  Hope along with 29 states and territories are commemorating the anniversary of the final withdrawal of US troops with a day of appreciation March 29.”
“I hope there is a good turnout, and I ask folks to be a part of this, rain or shine. Show your Dad, Mother, Brother, Uncle that you care,” he said.
Brown said the current route for the proposed March 29 parade is set to start at 1001 South Main at the Brazzel Funeral Home parking lot, and he said that owner Eddie Brazzel will organize and coordinate the motorcade.
Brown that that all floats are welcome, and he encouraged any perspective parade participants to contact him at 870-397-0338.
“The Vietnam soldiers did not get the respect that they richly deserved when they came home from the war. We can give them that long overdue ‘Welcome Home’ that they should have gotten then, now. It is never too late to do the right thing,” he said.
According to Brown, more than 40 years after the war, many Vietnam-era veterans continue to feel the effects of their service, including Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, illnesses from Agent Orange, as well in injuries and wounds from the war itself.
Brown also said, “The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund believes their fight should be honored. VVMF’s ‘In Memory’ program honors those whose lives were cut short as a result of their service. ‘In Memory’ is a way that all Vietnam veterans can be honored on the National Mall.”
“In Memory” actually started in 1999, and it has honored more that 2,500 Vietnam-era veterans to date.
Touting what he hopes will be a big turnout and participation, Brown said “As we approach March 29, let’s take time to remember those who honorably served for this Vietnam Veterans Day.”