An estimated crowd of 540 on Sunday at Hempstead Hall saw plenty of pretty girls, Broadway-style singing, clever special effects, athleticism, and colorful costumes jammed into a brisk and entertaining one-hour extravaganza that was “Skatetacular Dreams on Ice.”

An estimated crowd of 540 on Sunday at Hempstead Hall saw plenty of pretty girls, Broadway-style singing, clever special effects, athleticism, and colorful costumes jammed into a brisk and entertaining one-hour extravaganza that was “Skatetacular Dreams on Ice.”
Still, as awe inspiring as the overall production was, and in particular, two of the show’s standouts, Catherine League and Natalie Rhae, the pretense of the show — ice staking — still proved to be the outstanding attraction.
The synthetic “ice stage” was as much a star as anything as the 11 central performers glided around the Hempstead theatre stage with all the ease and style of Olympic skaters seen on television.
The show’s Stage Producer Alex Wolfe said the “Ice” was a synthetic hard plastic, not unlike a kitchen cutting board, with an oil-like lubricant applied, which enables the simulation of “ice skating” with actual skating blades worn by performers.
In an interview Sunday after the show, League, both a trained Broadway singer and ice skater, said “Yes, the plastic ice; it is kind of strange, but it very much feels like ice skating in on real ice would. You would be surprised how many people we fool with that, still thinking it is real ice.”
“As a skater, it takes a little more leg power because the plastic still behaves a bit differently than ice; it is much firmer, but anything you can do on ice, you can do on that plastic. But, there is none of that cool breeze that you get from the ice itself,” she said.
League, based in New York, played the central character, also named Catherine, in the production, which is in its second season.
“My character loves the winter season, and the story is about her journey through the seasons and self-discovery. She always longs for winter all year long, and winter is always associated with ice skating, which is something she loves.”
Carrying a good part of the show with both her singing and skating was a challenge League accepted, but she said “I love it. I love all the great things, and it has so many cool elements to it. The fire, the ice, the dancing… I love being up there and being a part of it.”
Wolfe said the performers, including League, actually sang their songs, which he emphasized, “There was no lip-syncing; they were all singing their own songs live to the production soundtrack. In that way, it was like a Broadway musical.”
Another standout of Sunday’s performance was an acrobat dance performer, Natalie Rhae of California, who did a stunning Chinese pole act and various floor dances in between skate production numbers.
Her bending, climbing, dancing and stretching elicited both awes and groans from the crowd, amazed that Rhae could flex and manipulate her body and limbs as she did.
League brags on her co-star, saying “Natalie is amazing; she's really a fantastic  contortionist, and she’s an incredible performer.”
The show clearly attracted a younger audience as evidenced by the high number of girls, aged 2 to 12, and in general, females outnumbered the males nearly 5-to-1 in the crowd Sunday in Hempstead Hall.
In the course of the story, the Catherine character encounters various witches and enchantresses, some of whom represented the seasons other than her beloved winter, and he eventually meets up with a “Jack Frost” for a winter celebration at the finale.
The fast paced show also featured clever effects and gimmicks with with black lighting and glow-in-the-dark costumes and illusionist-style tricks during costume changes for some of the female performers.
Hempstead Hall Director Dolly Henley said afterwards, “It was a good show, an interesting show, with variety and a little something for everyone. We’ve never had anything quite like this before.”