Black History Month will prove to be a bit of a happy Homecoming locally this year as Hope native and United States Magistrate Judge-designate Doris L. Pryor will come up to deliver the keynote speech for Black History Month on Monday, February 5 at Hempstead Hall.

Black History Month will prove to be a bit of a happy Homecoming locally this year as Hope native and United States Magistrate Judge-designate Doris L. Pryor will come up to deliver the keynote speech for Black History Month on Monday, February 5 at Hempstead Hall.
Pryor is the daughter of a current Hope School District official, Linda Clark, and the granddaughter of a current Hempstead Quorum Court Justice of the Peace, Doris Brown, who represents Hope in her district.
Pryor’s scheduled Monday morning speech, set to start at 10 a.m., is part of a Black History Program sponsored by the President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site with the theme “Honoring Our People: Sharing Stories of Hope.”
Pryor was born in Hope, and she graduated Hope High School in 1994. She has gone on to greater success in national public service, now with a pending appointment as a United States Magistrate Judge, and as a current National Security Unit Chief for the United States Attorney’s Office.
In making the announcement Tuesday morning, Supervisory Park Ranger Christian H. Davis, also known as Chief of Interpretation and Education at the President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site, said “This is an awesome time to for us to recall the stories and leaders from Hope. We honor the untold and underrepresented narratives of our American story, and through the work of the National Park Service we help ensure that these stories continue to be passed on faithfully, completely, and accurately.”
Davis also said, “This is a free event and open to the public.”
While Pryor’s official appointment as a new United States Magistrate Judge was still pending as the Hope Star was preparing to go to press for its January 24 edition, she still currently serves as the National Security Unit Chief for the United States Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Indiana.
In that role, since 2014, Pryor has been responsible for prosecuting domestic and international terrorism, cyber-threat cases, export violations, white collar fraud, trade secret violations, drug and violent crimes that occur in the Southern District of Indiana.
According to her official government biography, from August 2006 until her appointment as National Security Chief, Pryor served as an Assistant United States Attorney for the Southern District of Indiana. From August 2005 through August 2006, she served as a Deputy Public Defender on the State of Arkansas Public Defenders Commission.
She also has served two terms as a law clerk, for Judge J. Leon Holmes in the US. District Court for the Eastern District of Arkansas (August 2004-August 2005), and for Chief Judge Lavenski Smith of the US. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit (August 2003-August 2004).
While achieving professional success, Pryor has also been a dedicated wife and mother. She married her college sweetheart in Indiana, Johnny Pryor, and she has a three-year old son, named Johnny Samuel.
Pryor was an honor student in her time at Hope High School in the early 1990s, and her brother, Michael Clark, was there with her, too, graduating HHS in 1992. Both siblings reunited at the University of Central Arkansas in Conway, where Pryor graduated in 1999.
For more information on the event, Davis said people can contact the President Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site Visitor Center at (870) 777-4455.