In addition to citizen's complaints about Hope Water & Light, the Hope City Board had its own 2018 budget to approve on Tuesday night as well as hearing a presentation on drainage at the Hope Airport.

In addition to citizen’s complaints about Hope Water & Light, the Hope City Board had its own 2018 budget to approve on Tuesday night as well as hearing a presentation on drainage at the Hope Airport.
As previously reported in the Dec. 13 edition of the Hope Star, the 2018 budget ultimately approved by the Hope City Board on Tuesday, shows estimated $10.7 million in revenues against $10.7 in expenses, representing a balanced budget.
City Board Member Trevor Coffee complimented City Manager Catherine Cook and Finance Director Debbie Hall on being “good managers of the city’s budget and expenses.”
“I think you’ve done well in keeping expenses in line,” he said.
As the budget was extensively reviewed in a three-hour session during the Dec. 5 Hope City Board meeting, there was little discussion on Tuesday night other than voting to adopt the budget itself, which the board did by a 4-0 vote.  Board member Mark Ross was absent due to illness Tuesday night and did not vote, and two other board members, Don Hall and Reggie Easter, were also not present.
The new 2018 city budget includes $1,000 employee raises, and it is approximately 9.8 percent more than last year.
The meeting actually started with a presentation from Mary Fair of Garver Engineering, who discussed drainage issues at the Hope Airport.
Fair outlined a four-phase plan which will ultimately cost $1,278,000 with approximately ten-percent coming from matching funds from the City of Hope and the rest through a combination of FAA grants and state monies.
Fair spoke of immediate work needed for 2018 would begin to address hazardous flooding due to collapsed drainage pipes.
Airport Manager Paul Henley said hard rains often produced several inches of water that covered up the airfield’s lights, making landing a plane potentially dangerous.  Cook concurred saying Hope has been subject to “intense rains” over the past couple of years, so it was reasonable to assume airplanes could encounter poor landing conditions.
Although Fair indicated that replacing some of the pipes would involve tearing up part of the airfield, she said the project itself was strictly a drainage project, not a resurfacing one.
Cook said resurfacing the Hope airfield would cost several millions of dollars.
For the board’s action, it had to vote to revise the city’s Capital Improvement Plan for the airport project, which it eventually did.