Two new committees, one county-based and one city-based , held simultaneous meetings lasting over an hour on Monday night, each seeking to set up programs and initiatives of community-wide interest and consequence.

Two new committees, one county-based and one city-based , held simultaneous meetings lasting over an hour on Monday night, each seeking to set up programs and initiatives of community-wide interest and consequence.
The City of Hope’s Beautification Committee with 10 persons met for its second session, after an initial meeting last week, while under the jurisdiction of Hempstead County, the official Bicentennial Steering Committee was discussing its mission statement and action plan as presented by Chairman Richard Reed before a group of 42 persons.
One concern noted by Reed right away was the lack of diversity in the Bicentennial’s group meeting as he noted not one African American person was present in the room.
“We’re either all in this together, or we are not,” Reed said, “I know this is a stake in the ground here, but we want inclusion from all towns and populations. This committee and subcommittees should reflect what Hempstead County looks like.”
Reed also read from an opening statement on the Bicentennial Committee, which he emphasized respect and transparency.  Reed presented the group with an extensive Bicentennial Celebration Planning book, which was some 14 pages long, and he requested that the group approve the working plan before they moved on.
Reed said, “Our committee’s task is not for us just celebrate our choices.  Our task is to make choices our children will grow up to celebrate the fair, caring and honorable past we gifted to them. We are remembering. But we are also building our children’s legacy.”
“This Bicentennial should be just as much a statement of our shared community vision as it is celebrating reverence for our past. We must initiate and celebrate community decisions which are a gift to our children as they inherit the consequences of our     choices,” he said.
Reed said that committee meetings were to be open public meetings and to be held at accessible locations, and all meetings were to encourage public comments, concerns and suggestions.
Reed also proposed that each sub-committee have four chairpersons as to ensure continuity and diversity, and he said he felt two chairs per committee should represent non-Hope locates.
“I don’t want this to be just a Hope-centric celebration,” he said.
Along with Reed, Josh Williams and Peggy Lloyd head what is called the HCBC Steering Committee, and Monday night, the group was looking to establish a Finance and Procedures Committee, Arts and Culture Committee, Historical Hempstead Committee, Promotion and Advertising Committee and Education and Schools Committee.
Reed said, “The key to success here is getting people active in these committees” as he encouraged the 32 persons in the room to recruit more persons within the community.
Reed also said, “Each event must be viewed and accessed from multiple perspectives, including but not limited to community diversity, educational value, overall community interest, artistic value, promotion of historical education, appreciation of our industry, and promote progressive goals for our future.”
At the Hope Beautification Committee, that group was looking at establishing a Christmas decoration contest, which residences would be registered, and the judged by a panel of Beautification members.
Tentatively, the group was looking at running the contest from December 5 to 10 with winners announced on December 12.
The group also agreed to establish a Facebook page to communicate details to the public as well as other committee initiatives.