On Thursday afternoon, the Hope Tourism Commission approved in principle a replacement for the locally iconic signage “Hope: A Slice of the Good Life” that stood on the side of Lynn Heckman's Hope Outdoor Power & Equipment building at 217 E 3rd. which faces the northbound lane of Hwy. 67.

On Thursday afternoon, the Hope Tourism Commission approved in principle a replacement for the locally iconic signage “Hope: A Slice of the Good Life” that stood on the side of Lynn Heckman’s Hope Outdoor Power & Equipment building at 217 E 3rd. which faces the northbound lane of Hwy. 67.
The total cost of the replacement banner setup has multiple components and costs, which will come out of the Commission’s billboard budget, and will total an estimated $3,997.
The replacement, which will feature interchangeable banners, will also have five additional signage panels to either promote local events or be used for the Commission to sell advertising at a later time.
Heckman, the owner of the building wall, had already pledged earlier this year to donate $1,000 towards the cost of a replacement sign. The Commission passed the motion to move ahead, contingent on getting Heckman’s approval which is pending.
The first replacement art for the wall is set to feature Bill Clinton and a saxphone, which Commission members believed would be a draw for tourists taking photos.
Paul Henley said other options, like night lighting could be added at a later time, and he said the expected life span per banner is three years.
“The good news is we can change those banners out anytime; we can always put something else up there,” Henley said.
As the Hope Star was preparing for press time for Friday’s edition, the Commission was set to listen to presentations from Southwest Arts Council Director George Smith and Hope City Manager Catherine Cook.  Smith was speaking to the Commissioners at deadline time, with Cook scheduled afterwards.
In other Commission news, the financial reports were approved after little discussion.  Don Still requested getting the financials the day or night before, so he could review them more closely.