In a scene worth of the legendary History Channel series of the mid-2000s, Monsterquest, a 275-pound wild hog seen eating on a calf in rural Hempstead County, and not far from Nevada County, was shot and killed, but the owner of the farm says the problems are just bringing for rural residents, and he claims local authorities have been slow and inactive in addressing the issue.

In a scene worth of the legendary History Channel series of the mid-2000s, Monsterquest, a 275-pound wild hog seen eating on a calf in rural Hempstead County, and not far from Nevada County, was shot and killed, but the owner of the farm says the problems are just bringing for rural residents, and he claims local authorities have been slow and inactive in addressing the issue.
“This whole county is being overrun with them, and at the rate, they are breeding, it will just be a matter of time for they take over the place.  They are tearing up the land, and they are a potential menace,” Eddie Wilson, whose farm sits two miles outside the Stover Springs area and also near Bodcaw, said.
“They are getting bolder for food; the one we shot just came up and started eating the calf. They are wild, and there are a lot of them. They could easily harm someone like a kid that got too close, and they will viciously defend their young,” he said.
Wilson said the wild hogs are constantly tearing up his land, and trying to fix it puts additional stress and damage on his equipment.
Prior to informing the Hope Star and Nevada County Picayune of the issue, Wilson said he has contacted authorities with Arkansas Fish and Game on numerous occasions, but he didn’t feel they were being responsive. Wilson also said Hempstead County authorities have not acted on the matter either.
“Nothing is being done, and the problem out here is getting worse,” Wilson said.
An avid gamesman and hunter in his own right, Hempstead County Judge Haskell Morse said “They are a nuisance, and there are a few of them out there; I’ve shot a few in my time, and the Fish and Game Commission says you can hunt them 24-7. There is no restriction.”
“And, this is not only Hempstead County or Arkansas; these wild hogs have been a problem in most southern states, and they migrate which makes it harder to control them. Wilson lives fairly close to Nevada County; if we run them out of Hempstead, then where will they go? They will likely run into Nevada …and, then how to you keep them from coming back in Hempstead?” Morse said.
Morse said he has encountered the wild hogs first hand, and he readily conceded that 300-lb. beasts were not uncommon.
“Now, they will defend their young, but I’ve never known one to attack a human for food. They are wild animals, but they will mostly root up the ground for food or eat animals like deer that are already dead,” he said.
To Wilson’s point, he believes that is already happening as he said, “When I first got out here, you used to be able to see 20 or 30 deer looking out the door at sunset. Today, I am lucky to see one or two. I think those hogs are depleting the deer population, and after that, what are they going to do for food, next?”
Wilson said that the wild hogs have 2-to-3 litters a year, and he added that the average litter can produce 7-or-8 additional hogs. He said that within two years that Hempstead County could be overrun by the animals.
Morse, however, said that population control of wild hogs has not traditionally been in the venue of the Hempstead County Quorum Court or county services.
“Arkansas Fish and Game normally addresses those issues, and we do have folks who regularly hunt them,” Morse said.
Wilson believes a hunter’s bounty needs to be placed on the beasts.
“They did it in Lafayette County for $15. Get folks out there shooting at them on a regular basis and you might be able to curtail them,” he said.