After hearing a donation proposal from Dox Building representative Teena Pilkinton Carter, the Hope Board of Directors decided instead to pursue demolition and a lein against the property.

After hearing a donation proposal from Dox Building representative Teena Pilkinton Carter, the Hope Board of Directors decided instead to pursue demolition and a lein against the property.
Carter, who represented the Betts Estate and JHB, opened Tuesday night’s meeting with a proposal to donate the Dox Building to the city for them to tear down, and then, turning into a park with part of the facade in tact.
Carter distributed hand-outs to the Board members and opened her proposal with an apology to the city and citizens for the condition of the building, said, “It has been an eye sore for years; the estate doesn’t have the money to tear it down or rebuild it.”
She said that with the City’s assistance, the building could be torn down safely and then turned into a “pocket part”
“We would like to preserve the facade,” she said, even as she was saying the family was offering to donate it to the City of Hope.
Carter also said she would donate the property to the city with $16,000 in back taxes paid, but City Attorney Joe Short said not all the heirs have transferred their interest to Carter's company and a “clean title” to the property was needed for it to be donated.
Carter, however, told Short and the Board that the heirs have agreed verbally in principal to transfer their interest to her. She said the transfer would take up to three weeks to complete.
City Manager Catherine Cook said the City had only discussed bringing down the building as opposed to “saving the façade.” She said she believed saving the façade would add additional cost.
“The discussions I’ve had with the engineer from Texarkana was to take it down, and to take it down without damaging the other properties and without anyone getting hurt,” she said.
Hope Mayor Steve Montgomery said the priority was to take it down safely and that no citizens get hurt. The property has been condemned since January 2015.
Carter said, “I want the Board to do what you feel is right.”
In related news to downtown Hope, the Board heard from Bob Erwin, who spoke about an earlier meeting Tuesday in downtown with 34 downtown business and property owners.  Erwin said the group discussed the possibility of forming a “Downtown Merchants Association,” and he said the group would be meeting again in two weeks.
In other city-related business Tuesday, the Board heard from Assistant Police Chief Kim Tomlin, who requested to apply for a police grant for approximately $9,200 on equipment and on-board car computers.
The Board also heard about an AEP grant for $35,000 to help fund a portion of a proposed pavilion the Farmers Market. Cook said the project would be estimated at $188,000 with about half coming from grants and about $40,000 from donations. This area would also include an urban garden.
The Board also considered the City’s annual bid for garbage bags. Cook said the low bid was from the current vendor, Houston Poly, for $37,000, which ended up being $5,000 less than 2016. The bags are both distributed and sold to city residents, who have city garbage pickup.