After an estimated two months, the University of Arkansas at Hope unveiled a sculpture to commemorate 50 years of being an institution of higher learning on Wednesday during a special community coffee event hosted by the university inside the Hope Suite of Hempstead Hall.

After an estimated two months, the University of Arkansas at Hope unveiled a sculpture to commemorate 50 years of being an institution of higher learning on Wednesday during a special community coffee event hosted by the university inside the Hope Suite of Hempstead Hall.
"The sculpture piece we are dedicating today is meant to be a beautiful and permanent reflection of the 50 years of service of the University of Arkansas at Hope and Texarkana," Chancellor Chris Thomason said.   
He said the sculpture is not just a reflection of the college's past, but a celebration of the future services that will be offered.
Thomason highlighted the key moments throughout the campuses time: it's founding in 1965, a resident's vote to join the University of Arkansas system in 1966, the University of Arkansas Hope and Texarkana foundation and the construction of the Texarkana campus in 2012.
The sculpture is by local artist Judy Wright Walter.
The sculpture is called "Education: The Window to a  Better World".
She acknowledged Jerome La Grand of La Grand and Sons welding for taking her two dimensional drawing, and translating it into metal.
"He is not only a master/expert metal smith, but one with an artist's eye," she said.
She said it could not have been created without him. She said the sculpture took about 8 months to create.
"The inspiration came from Chris (Thomason) describing to me what this was to commemorate," Walter said.
She said the college was created back in her era. She said she got to watch it grow, and is now proud to be a part of that growth.
She said the elements of the sculpture, and the idea behind it, was to show the building of the college in a practical way.
"By using the metals in the center piece to anchor this. The metals used were actually here at the college in warehouses, that we selected, took them back to the shop and hopefully welded them into an artistic form, and symbolism of growing," Walter said.
She said each part of the sculpture is a representation of how the campus has transformed, and continues to move forward.