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Hope Star - Hope, AR
  • Lloyd among Arkansas' heroes

  • As Brigadier General Herbert Jack Lloyd (Ret.), of Hope, was inducted Friday night into the Arkansas Military Veterans Hall of Fame in Little Rock, a large delegation of Hope residents was present to honor a native son who has served his country, in the words of one long-time friend with an “authenticity of character” that is a key to what should define heroism in America.
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  • As Brigadier General Herbert Jack Lloyd (Ret.), of Hope, was inducted Friday night into the Arkansas Military Veterans Hall of Fame in Little Rock, a large delegation of Hope residents was present to honor a native son who has served his country, in the words of one long-time friend with an “authenticity of character” that is a key to what should define heroism in America. “War, the most formidable and compelling of educations, causes a sensitive and thoughtful man to understand what many American political and cultural leaders don't understand about the hard realities of man's struggles on this suffering planet,” Jackson, Tenn., attorney and author Ivy Scarborough wrote in tribute to Lloyd. Scarborough recalls Lloyd's combat service in the Vietnam War as an example. “In a sense the Vietnam War never ended for Herb Lloyd,” he writes. “Four years of watching those he loved die violent deaths in a cause that would be swept into the unforgiving, readily forgetting, annals of history's failures forged in him a determination to never personally forget the sacrifices and never fail to personally sacrifice of himself.” Hope Mayor Dennis Ramsey, who attended the ceremonies, said Lloyd was recommended, not only by himself, but by three or four other generals, and by the man who for many years directed the United States' anti-Soviet engagement in Afghanistan, Milton Bearden, a 30-year CIA veteran and former chief of the Soviet/East European Division of the agency. Selection of Lloyd and the 14 other honorees at the ceremony was made through a panel of distinguished military veterans from Arkansas. Other honorees included Col. Paul Longgrear, of Jonesboro, Sgt. Stephen Branham, of Des Arc, the late Gunnery Sgt. Carlos Hathcock, of North Little Rock, Brig. Gen. Lynn Hooper, of Jonesboro, the late First Lt. Harry Godwin, of Hampton, First Lt. Walter Rhodes, of Benton, Col. Charles Milam, of Camden, Sgt. Artis Breland, of Camden, Master Sgt. James Clifton, of Vilonia, Col. Jesse Johnson, of Pocohontas, Sgt. Dale Bumpers, of Charleston, Sergeant Major Don Cain, of Bearden, Major Ronnie Miller, of Jonesboro, and Pfc. Albert Richardson, of Jonesboro. A native of Hempstead County, Lloyd entered military service in the U. S. Army in 1955, and following infantry and airborne training, he served with the 11th Airborne Division in Germany until 1958. He returned to Ft. Bragg to serve as squad leader and platoon sergeant in Co. C, 501st Airborne, until March, 1962, when, as a staff sergeant, Lloyd was assigned to to the Sixth Vietnamese Parachute Battalion as an American advisor. Lloyd returned to the U. S. in 1963 to take officer training, and was assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division as a second lieutenant and company commander in the Dominican Republic later that year. In 1966, he returned to Vietnam to serve as assistant and then senior advisor to Vietnamese Sixth Parachute Battalion. Lloyd later took the Infantry Advanced Course and served in the Airborne Department of the Army until 1971, when he returned to Vietnam as part of an Army study group on combat effectiveness. From 1971-73, he studied at Auburn University, where he earned bachelor and master's degrees, then Lloyd attended the Command and General Staff School, graduating in 1974 to serve on the staff of the U. S. Military Academy at West Point until 1978. Lloyd transferred to the Eighth Infantry Division in Germany in 1978, and returned to Fort Polk in 1980 to command the 3/11 Infantry, Fifth Infantry Division. Upon completion of Army War College studies in 1985, he returned to Ft. Polk as commander of the Second Brigade, Fifth Infantry Division, after which he became Assistant Division Commander of the 24th Infantry Division. Upon completion of studies at the Royal College of Defense Studies, in London, England, Lloyd was promoted to brigadier general, his rank of retirement, after concluding his active duty career as Assistant Division Commander, Second Infantry Division in Korea. He has served overseas in various commands and capacities for 32 years, including 16 years in the Muslim world. Lloyd has been awarded two Silver Stars, six Bronze Stars, three of which were given with “V” for valor enhancements, two Purple Hearts, for wounds received in combat, the Soldier's Medal, five Army Commendation Medals, including one with “V” enhancement, the Army Ranger Tab, Master Parachutist Badge, the Pathfinder Badge, and three combat jump commendations with the Sixth Vietnamese Parachute Battalion.
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